How high will you go to get that vinyl

MeanandGreen

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Dec 26, 2012
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Is about £38 I think for a rare promotional 12" single with unreleased mixes in mint condition. That was me really pushing the boat out for a record.

I've bought a couple of other ones for £30, it's pretty much the most I'm prepared to pay and it has to be special for me to go that high. Most of my vinyl has been well under a tenner.

I've seen records on eBay going well above £200, I personally dont think any album is worth 3 figure £££ prices. It would have to be mega rare almost extinct and not available any other way, even then I don't think I could do it.
 

MajorFubar

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Mar 3, 2010
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I paid £50 to get a near-mint MFSL copy of Abbey Road, think it was about 10 years ago. But mostly what few LPs I buy aren't especially valuable and rarely break double figures.
 

Frank Harvey

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Paid around £100 each for the Fight Club and Social Network soundtracks. If I see a Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (Trent Reznor/Atticus Ross) for around £200-250, I'll jump on that immediately.
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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I paid £50 for the Nick Drake Fruit Tree box set in the 90s, which was the rrp at that time. The most I've paid for a used record is around £30 for a 2nd pressing of Neu 75 by Neu.

I really don't think I'd ever pay more than that for a record, no matter how much I wanted it.
 

Freddy58

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Jan 24, 2014
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW said:
I paid £50 for the Nick Drake Fruit Tree box set in the 90s, which was the rrp at that time. The most I've paid for a used record is around £30 for a 2nd pressing of Neu 75 by Neu.

I really don't think I'd ever pay more than that for a record, no matter how much I wanted it.
I pretty much agree. I saw a copy of Abbey Road for £35 last year. I was sorely tempted, but it was a step too far.
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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Freddy58 said:
BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW said:
I paid £50 for the Nick Drake Fruit Tree box set in the 90s, which was the rrp at that time. The most I've paid for a used record is around £30 for a 2nd pressing of Neu 75 by Neu.

I really don't think I'd ever pay more than that for a record, no matter how much I wanted it.
I pretty much agree. I saw a copy of Abbey Road for £35 last year. I was sorely tempted, but it was a step too far.
I've just been going through my vinyl on Discogs to try and pinpoint which exact copy I have of each record I own, and one thing I've learned, is how the slightest of differences on matrix numbers on the run out grooves can make a masssive difference on the price.

Chances are Freddy, that copy of Abbey Road wasn't what you thought it was.

Did you know that there are atleast 25 different UK pressings of Blue Monday by New Order from 1983 alone?
 

Freddy58

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Jan 24, 2014
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW said:
Freddy58 said:
BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW said:
I paid £50 for the Nick Drake Fruit Tree box set in the 90s, which was the rrp at that time. The most I've paid for a used record is around £30 for a 2nd pressing of Neu 75 by Neu.

I really don't think I'd ever pay more than that for a record, no matter how much I wanted it.
I pretty much agree. I saw a copy of Abbey Road for £35 last year. I was sorely tempted, but it was a step too far.
I've just been going through my vinyl on Discogs to try and pinpoint which exact copy I have of each record I own, and one thing I've learned, is how the slightest of differences on matrix numbers on the run out grooves can make a masssive difference on the price.

Chances are Freddy, that copy of Abbey Road wasn't what you thought it was.

Did you know that there are atleast 25 different UK pressings of Blue Monday by New Order from 1983 alone?
Naturally, I wouldn't have a clue as to what was on offer, regarding Abbey Road. They actually had three copies, all varying on condition. Cheapest was around £11, IIRC. In any event, I'd probably rather get it on CD, than pay that. Still, you never know *smile*
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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Freddy58 said:
Naturally, I wouldn't have a clue as to what was on offer, regarding Abbey Road. They actually had three copies, all varying on condition. Cheapest was around £11, IIRC. In any event, I'd probably rather get it on CD, than pay that. Still, you never know *smile*
No Freddy! CD? NO!

You should be able to pick up an excellent vinyl copy for little over a tenner. I used to have one of these and it was decent. Have a look on Discogs.
 

Freddy58

Well-known member
Jan 24, 2014
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW said:
Freddy58 said:
Naturally, I wouldn't have a clue as to what was on offer, regarding Abbey Road. They actually had three copies, all varying on condition. Cheapest was around £11, IIRC. In any event, I'd probably rather get it on CD, than pay that. Still, you never know *smile*
No Freddy! CD? NO!

You should be able to pick up an excellent vinyl copy for little over a tenner. I used to have one of these and it was decent. Have a look on Discogs.
One there for £15, but remastered. I'm always a bit dubious of remasters.
 
B

BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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Freddy58 said:
One there for £15, but remastered. I'm always a bit dubious of remasters.
I had mine for many years, but I was lucky enough to find a 70s reissue for very little, so sold it.

Keep an eye on Discogs, you should be able to get a decent 70s reissue for around £15, you just have to keep checking. If you register with Discogs, you can get email updates every time a new copy is put up for sale.
 

stevebrock

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I paid £40 for a sealed copy of Massive Attack - Heligoland 3 x 180g

I am staggered to see that it is commanding £150-£170 on discogs - however I am a collector and like listening to the damn thing so it is not for sale
 

Jim_W

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Sep 25, 2015
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A fool and his money are soon parted when addiction is part of the equation. A lovely spring day, a beautiful bike ride which will lead, inevitably, to a record shop or a market stall...usually both. In my head there are notions pertaining to how much I can afford to spend, but my head didn't bank on being confronted with a copy of a rare mono New York Blue Note or some psychedelic classic that has long been an object of desire. You can walk away, you can haggle and point out the crease in the cover or the scuffs on Side One or you can be reduced to a senseless idiot consumed by the desire to, well, consume. I have fallen into the latter category many many times; these days, not so much. But tomorrow, the sun might shine and I know this guy who'll be on a market stall and it's a nice day for a bike ride and he sent me an email to say he's just picked up a really interesting collection and...and....and.

How high the moon?
 

MajorFubar

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Mar 3, 2010
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The question I always ask when deciding how much I'll pay is 'do you want to collect it, or play it?', and usually it's the latter. Record collectors have wet dreams about finding some desirable old LP still shrinkwrapped, but who the hell wants a record that devalues by two thirds the minute you open it and play it? That's what it was made for, right? So I'm definitely not a collector.

Probably explains why my £50 copy of MFSL Abbey Road will remain the most expensive record I will ever buy. I wanted it because it's my favourite Beatles album and I heard legendary tales about how good the MFSL pressings were. But horror of horrors I confess I have actually played it, probably nearly a dozen times in ten years, because believe it or not I bought it to actually do just that.
 

Jim_W

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Sep 25, 2015
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This whole area was the subject of some pretty fierce exchanges in the letters section of Record Collector mag; I think most contributors agreed with you, as I do too, that records are for playing and not for storing away in a hermetically sealed environment.

Having said that I do collect records, but my collection is only a result of having bought the records to listen to the music; this has often meant buying less than pristine copies of rare records and buffing them up so they're listenable. Some of my favourite lps are a bit battered, but for me that's part and parcel of collecting and, if I'm honest, I enjoy the challenge of restoring impossibly rare records that have been bashed about a bit or neglected; sometimes they're beyond repair of course or I'll need to find a better copy as and when. Anyway, I like the ruin in things, but many don't. Fair enough.

The real problem re the 'playing or collecting' issue doesn't really manifest itself until you've got pretty much all of the readily available rarities that you covert; then the 'do I want to play it or collect?' becomes crucial because you're moving into the realm of ultra-rare stuff that, even in VG, is going to cost an arm and a leg. Then the complex mental wrangling really kicks in: 'Ok it's rare, but do I really want it? Yes!! 'Yes, but it's probably rubbish' Yeah well....but you'll never see another copy' 'I won't buy any records for a couple of months if I buy this.' Dealer: 'I have to tell you there's quite a few people interested in that record...I've had some offers'. Cue, sweating, palpitations and haggling over the price; there then follows an adrenaline rush like no other as you rush home, stealing glances at the sleeve. And yes, it's a bit rubbish...oh and it's warped too but it's rare and you needed it to complete your Hugh Organ and The Dazzling Sausages collection; or, of course, it's better than you thought it would be and it takes pride of place in your collection...for a few days...until the next time.

If this is meaningless drivel, be happy that you have, thus far, avoided this debilitating disease. Music, not hi-fi, is my addiction; collecting is something that just seems to happen in tandem with searching out records that you've read about. Don't get involved with it.
 

MajorFubar

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Jim_W said:
 ...And yes, it's a bit rubbish...oh and it's warped too but it's rare and you needed it to complete your Hugh Organ and The Dazzling Sausages collection
Lol I'm waiting for someone to tell me Primo Scala's According Band 78s are worth a bomb, one way or another I've ended up with nearly a dozen of those in my 78s collection. I could be sitting on a fortune but likely they're worth more as plantpots.
 

Daz B

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Mar 10, 2010
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The most I have paid for a record was £100 for a mint copy of The Door Waiting For The Sun 1st press Mono. I would say iam a record collector but do play the records I collect. I do know some collectors that never play there records and buy them as a investment. I firmly believe a record should be played and enjoyed.
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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Jim_W said:
This whole area was the subject of some pretty fierce exchanges in the letters section of Record Collector mag; I think most contributors agreed with you, as I do too, that records are for playing and not for storing away in a hermetically sealed environment.

Having said that I do collect records, but my collection is only a result of having bought the records to listen to the music; this has often meant buying less than pristine copies of rare records and buffing them up so they're listenable. Some of my favourite lps are a bit battered, but for me that's part and parcel of collecting and, if I'm honest, I enjoy the challenge of restoring impossibly rare records that have been bashed about a bit or neglected; sometimes they're beyond repair of course or I'll need to find a better copy as and when. Anyway, I like the ruin in things, but many don't. Fair enough.

The real problem re the 'playing or collecting' issue doesn't really manifest itself until you've got pretty much all of the readily available rarities that you covert; then the 'do I want to play it or collect?' becomes crucial because you're moving into the realm of ultra-rare stuff that, even in VG, is going to cost an arm and a leg. Then the complex mental wrangling really kicks in: 'Ok it's rare, but do I really want it? Yes!! 'Yes, but it's probably rubbish' Yeah well....but you'll never see another copy' 'I won't buy any records for a couple of months if I buy this.' Dealer: 'I have to tell you there's quite a few people interested in that record...I've had some offers'. Cue, sweating, palpitations and haggling over the price; there then follows an adrenaline rush like no other as you rush home, stealing glances at the sleeve. And yes, it's a bit rubbish...oh and it's warped too but it's rare and you needed it to complete your Hugh Organ and The Dazzling Sausages collection; or, of course, it's better than you thought it would be and it takes pride of place in your collection...for a few days...until the next time.

If this is meaningless drivel, be happy that you have, thus far, avoided this debilitating disease. Music, not hi-fi, is my addiction; collecting is something that just seems to happen in tandem with searching out records that you've read about. Don't get involved with it.
Jim

You've put it more eloquently than I ever could, and I agree with every word you've said.
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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I saw a guy I kind of knew at a record fair, and he was just buying mint, or very close to mint records as an investment, and he didn't even have a turntable. I knew he was a ****, I just didn't realise how much of one he was.

I collect, and I play records, that's the package, buying to never play is just denying yourself the pleasure that records can bring. The only exception I have to this, is 'Blackstar' by Bowie on clear vinyl, which I will never open. I bought the standard vinyl to play, so I don't need to open it or play it.
 

Jim_W

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Sep 25, 2015
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I know several jerks that just file 'em away too; they're total tossers as human beings too. You know the sort...ooops, no, better not: the desription will sound like me!

Regarding the question of filing them away, well, as people who read my stuff are aware that there's a few in the loft, but they're stored upright, boxed etc; they don't live there though and I'm always bringing stuff down and taking others back up. I wish I had the sort of house that was designed to accomodate wall shelves, but it's either radiators or walls that get loads of sun that prevent this. People still don't believe I bought this house primarily because of the loft space, but it's absolutely true; record storage had become an isssue. It's even more of a problem now so they're up against walls, speakers and in small floorstanding shelving things in most rooms. I'd love to display them properly though.

The Doors: 'Waiting For The Sun' mono is pretty rare in both UK and US form, the UK less so I think as I've seen a few copies recently. The UK mono is definitely a fold-down from the stereo, but it has that mono thump to it. I may be wrong but I think the US mono is a dedicated mono mix or at least some of the tracks are true mono...certainly the singles are. It got slagged off by the music press at the time of release, but I think it's improved with age...in fact, I'd go so far as to say it's my favourite...no wait, that's 'Strange Days'....no, no 'Morrison Hotel'....maybe 'LA Woman'. Jim wasn't a great poet, but The Doors were great theatre.
 

Daz B

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Mar 10, 2010
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The Doors - Waiting For The Sun mono was not sold in the US but copies were produced and given to Radio stations. This is according to the Elekra records discography website. The UK mono was sold but is still rare especially in mint to excellent condition. The record I have been trying to get is the UK release of the single Break on through. These when come available often go for £40 pound plus.
 

Jim_W

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Sep 25, 2015
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Well, if that's what it states on the Elektra website then it must be right. I do know Doors collectors who have the US mono though, so I can only think that they sent out quite a few to radio stations. Not heard it myself, but I've got a UK mono which I'm sure is a stereo fold-down...although 'Wintertime Love' is supposed to be a dedicated mono mix. I've got a copy of 'The Unknown Soldier'/ 'We Could Be So Good Together' single which is in mono. All very interesting.
 

iandb1970

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Jan 12, 2014
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Jim_W said:
Having said that I do collect records, but my collection is only a result of having bought the records to listen to the music; this has often meant buying less than pristine copies of rare records and buffing them up so they're listenable. Some of my favourite lps are a bit battered, but for me that's part and parcel of collecting and, if I'm honest, I enjoy the challenge of restoring impossibly rare records that have been bashed about a bit or neglected; sometimes they're beyond repair of course or I'll need to find a better copy as and when. Anyway, I like the ruin in things, but many don't. Fair enough.
Tell me about the restoring of battered records? I am interested in finding out more.
 

Waxy

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May 15, 2014
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I treated myself and paid £100 for a mint copy of Storm In Heaven by Verve.

Was it worth it? You betcha.
 
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BIGBERNARDBRESSLAW

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Jim_W said:
The Doors: 'Waiting For The Sun' mono is pretty rare in both UK and US form
https://www.discogs.com/Doors-Waiting-For-The-Sun/release/4486154

https://www.discogs.com/Doors-Waiting-For-The-Sun/release/4529265

https://www.discogs.com/Doors-Waiting-For-The-Sun/release/5290616

https://www.discogs.com/Doors-Waiting-For-The-Sun/release/4293286

https://www.discogs.com/Doors-Waiting-For-The-Sun/release/3965318
 

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