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Frequency response

AEJim

Well-known member
Nov 17, 2008
68
2
18,545
Yeah, that's a very flat one. In an ideal world that's what you'd aim for, in reality it wouldn't necessarily sound the best... :)
 

Nelly

New member
Apr 18, 2013
23
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0
hahahahahaahahahah omg sorry my post never came up lol

what i was going to ask is frequency response a major factor in choosing standmounts as the price and frequecy response difference is quite large is it a true scale or does the equipment and input source matter more ?

ps.cant believe my first post never posted it took me ages to write nut i think you get the message :)
 

BigH

New member
Dec 29, 2012
97
0
0
Its a common problem with this forum, best to copy before posting and then if does not come up you can just edit and paste.

What do you mean by frequency response, yes I know what it is. AEJim is probably the best person to answer as he makes speakers.
 

Nelly

New member
Apr 18, 2013
23
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0
what i mean is i see all the different types of standmount speakers with frequency responses from 35hz-20khz then others 60hz-50khz so can the later sound better bass wise as the frequency for the lows are higher so less bass or is this a compromise better mid/high frequencies less bass.

what im realy asking is should i be looking at frequency response or more concerned about the equipment that will be used with the speakers
 

AEJim

Well-known member
Nov 17, 2008
68
2
18,545
Hi Nelly,

I honestly wouldn't worry too much about quoted frequency responses of loudspeakers, in reality there are so many factors as to how your system will sound. You rarely hear the lowest notes in "normal" music and just because a speaker may reach 30Hz at +/- 3dB there's nothing to say it won't have a very strong midband or treble which on balance could make the speaker sound lightweight.

Your room is also a huge factor in the sound - I had some pre-production prototype speakers at home a few weeks back and they measured up in the midrange by about 2-3dB on our reference samples, in my room however they sounded far too bassy (and this was a small speaker) purely due to the nature of the room and the positioning. After I'd blocked the ports they sounded fairly balanced but if I were to take them back to the office and measure like that they would look to have very weak bass!

I'd say by and large to ignore pretty much all the figures you see on speakers within reason, find a shortlist of those you think suit what you're after (including looks and size you could live with) and have a demo, preferably in a room/system similar to yours and if at all possible even try at home.
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
Apr 28, 2008
1,636
83
19,770
AEJim said:
Hi Nelly,

I honestly wouldn't worry too much about quoted frequency responses of loudspeakers, in reality there are so many factors as to how your system will sound. You rarely hear the lowest notes in "normal" music and just because a speaker may reach 30Hz at +/- 3dB there's nothing to say it won't have a very strong midband or treble which on balance could make the speaker sound lightweight.

Your room is also a huge factor in the sound - I had some pre-production prototype speakers at home a few weeks back and they measured up in the midrange by about 2-3dB on our reference samples, in my room however they sounded far too bassy (and this was a small speaker) purely due to the nature of the room and the positioning. After I'd blocked the ports they sounded fairly balanced but if I were to take them back to the office and measure like that they would look to have very weak bass!

I'd say by and large to ignore pretty much all the figures you see on speakers within reason, find a shortlist of those you think suit what you're after (including looks and size you could live with) and have a demo, preferably in a room/system similar to yours and if at all possible even try at home.
Agreed: Too many people get too hung up on paper specs. That's hi-fi but not as we know it, Jim. :)

(Heads quickly to the pub)
 

BigH

New member
Dec 29, 2012
97
0
0
I would not worry too much about FR. If you want a lot of bass then go for larger woofers and cabinets but best to hear them and make up your own mind. As Jim says the room can be a major factor to consider and also palcement.
 

Al ears

Moderator
Bomb shelter may be better PP.

Agreed too many paperwork exercises used by speaker companies these days.

Take very much with a pinch of salt... they will all produce suitable frequency range ..... unless you are half bat! :)
 

Nelly

New member
Apr 18, 2013
23
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0
thank you for the reply its been driving me mad i stated in another post i have a marantzpm6004 which has great reviews i said floor standers or standmount speaker to accompany the amp but i have decided after putting my cheap microlab solo6c intergrated amp speakers on stands that i am going for standmounts because the soundstage and detail i get from these (£70)so called desktop speakers is fantastic.

- Amplifier: Output power: 100 Watt RMS
- Power distribution: 50 Watt x 2
- Harmonic distortion: < 0.3% 1W 1kHz
- Frequency response: 55Hz - 20kHz
- Signal/Noise ratio: > 85dB
- Separation: > 55dB
- Input sensitivity: 440mV
- Nominal impedance: 4 ohm

- Speakers: Tweeter driver type: 1"
- Tweeter rated power: 10 Watt 6 ohm
- Bass driver type: 6.5"
- Bass rated power: 30 Watt
- Frequency range: 55Hz - 20kHz
- Output: Terminals
- Input: 2RCA
- Aux input: 2RCA
- Power: Power supply: AC 220 - 240V, 50Hz

now the frequency response is 55hz-20khz but to me i get some serious bass.my partner was in the bath oneday so i though i would turn the speakers up more than i normally do they have a digital volume display on 1 speaker that goes to 60 i turned it to 45 and oh boy the misses shouted through turn that down i asked if it was to loud she said no but she could feel the bass through the bath :).so i realy want a nice pair of speakers because if these can sound like they do then better speakers would enhance the sound even more.i have £400 to spend on the speakers just cant make my mind up which ones.my room measures 6mx4m my speakers are at least 4 foot from the rear wall left speakers about 1 foot from the side wall and right speaker in open space
 

hoopsontoast

New member
Oct 1, 2011
12
0
0
I would not worry about it, IME looking at a speakes FR does not give much of an indication on how it will sound in your room.

Most speakers are tested/measured in an anechoic chamber and even then, a Lot of manufacturers are quite liberal with the truth.
 

drummerman

New member
Jan 18, 2008
540
1
0
In the context of a group test of speakers measurements such as carried out by HifiNews and some others can give some interesting insight and comparisons. Even single speaker tests carried out by the afromentioned publication/s can be very informative because they adhere largely to exact measurement standards ie. microphone used, distance to speaker etc. and can be related to other speakers tested in that particular magazine.

They can be difficult to interpret to a 'non-hifi' person but they can also explain idiosynchracies as well as dubious manufacturing such as pair matching/channel imbalance or resonance behaviour by way of waterfall plot and load characteristics, all of which are relevant even with unknown variables such as different rooms and in the case of resistance, could infuence the choice of amplifier.

Manufacturer specifications can probably be largely ignored though. Even ohmage is largely just a quoting exercise and rarely give insight to resistance in real world situations. Having said that, the days of near impossible to drive speakers are probably mostly over.

regards
 

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