Food/cooking bar

Samd

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Mar 6, 2013
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I do all the cooking at home including batch jobs such as curries, chilli con c, etc and have just tried 2 weeks with Hello Fresh and said Goodbye Fresh before the freebies ran out! Fav meal of the week is thrice-cooked crispy chips (skin on) peas and cod loin in home made batter - simple but simply gorgeous!
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
I do all the cooking at home including batch jobs such as curries, chilli con c, etc and have just tried 2 weeks with Hello Fresh and said Goodbye Fresh before the freebies ran out! Fav meal of the week is thrice-cooked crispy chips (skin on) peas and cod loin in home made batter - simple but simply gorgeous!
I like triple cooked chips. Gawd bless Heston Blumenheck.
 

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DCarmi

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Nov 15, 2019
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I invested in an air fryer a couple of months ago. I was surprised how well and quickly it did oven chips, especially the chunky kind. Favourite snack of the moment is air fried crispy and spicy pork belly bites.

Favourite meal would be chicken dhansak, made from scratch.
 

robdmarsh

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Jun 28, 2015
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I do all the cooking at home including batch jobs such as curries, chilli con c, etc and have just tried 2 weeks with Hello Fresh and said Goodbye Fresh before the freebies ran out! Fav meal of the week is thrice-cooked crispy chips (skin on) peas and cod loin in home made batter - simple but simply gorgeous!
[/QUOT
I do all the cooking at home including batch jobs such as curries, chilli con c, etc and have just tried 2 weeks with Hello Fresh and said Goodbye Fresh before the freebies ran out! Fav meal of the week is thrice-cooked crispy chips (skin on) peas and cod loin in home made batter - simple but simply gorgeous!
Can you share your home-made batter recipe for cod loin? I know Gary Rhodes and others used soda water to make the batter light. Do you have to have a deep fat fryer for this and does it make the whole house smell?
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
I don't bother with fizzy water. Normal tap water chilled to almost frozen. Then season and add a tiny pinch of turmeric for colour only.
Quickly whisk but leave some lumps. They come out so crispy.

That batter below is made from gluten free flour
 

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I enjoy cooking. Some of my recent dishes.

IMG_20220422_181459_607.jpg
Chicken Changezi. It's a 900-year old recipe, before the influence of Mughlai cuisine in India.

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Egg masala curry

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Afghani lamb pulao

IMG_20220131_234052_489.jpg
Grilled tandoori chicken

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Grilled prawns with chilli, coriander and garlic dressing

IMG_20211218_103950_406.jpg
Monkfish tikka

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Pindi chana (chickpeas) - recipe from Rawalpindi, hence the name.
 
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I enjoy cooking. Some of my recent dishes.

View attachment 3534
Chicken Changezi. It's a 900-year old recipe, before the influence of Mughlai cuisine in India.

View attachment 3535
Egg masala curry

View attachment 3536
Afghani lamb pulao

View attachment 3537
Grilled tandoori chicken

View attachment 3538
Grilled prawns with chilli, coriander and garlic dressing

View attachment 3539
Monkfish tikka

View attachment 3540
Pindi chana (chickpeas) - recipe from Rawalpindi, hence the name.
I'll be around to your place shortly.... :)
 

plastic penguin

Well-known member
I enjoy cooking. Some of my recent dishes.

View attachment 3534
Chicken Changezi. It's a 900-year old recipe, before the influence of Mughlai cuisine in India.

View attachment 3535
Egg masala curry

View attachment 3536
Afghani lamb pulao

View attachment 3537
Grilled tandoori chicken

View attachment 3538
Grilled prawns with chilli, coriander and garlic dressing

View attachment 3539
Monkfish tikka

View attachment 3540
Pindi chana (chickpeas) - recipe from Rawalpindi, hence the name.
Looks good BB. Crikey, you like food from the Asian sub-continent. I have to be in the mood for that cuisine. I prefer Greek, Moroccan or Italian grub.
 
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Looks good BB. Crikey, you like food from the Asian sub-continent. I have to be in the mood for that cuisine. I prefer Greek, Moroccan or Italian grub.
Absolutely. I like to explore the authentic cuisines from the Indian subcontinent. Tonight I'm planning to cook a combination of black gram lentils, chana dal and red kidney beans. The dish is called maa ki dal or maa choliyan di dal or langar wali dal. Langar is a community kitchen and, as part of it, free vegetarian food is served in the kitchens of a Gurdwara (a Sikh temple) every day. This dal is extremely popular and staple food in Punjab area of India and Pakistan. Takes at least a couple of hours of slow cooking after soaking the lentils and beans overnight in water.

Traditionally, in olden days, many North Indian kitchens had a tandoor (charcoal clay oven) where they cooked dinner. They used to put a pan up with the lentils and water overnight on this oven after all cooking is complete for the day as the charcoal gradually cooled. Slow cooking at its best.
 
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plastic penguin

Well-known member
Absolutely. I like to explore the authentic cuisines from the Indian subcontinent. Tonight I'm planning to cook a combination of black gram lentils, chana dal and red kidney beans. The dish is called maa ki dal or maa choliyan di dal or langar wali dal. Langar is a community kitchen and, as part of it, free vegetarian food is served in the kitchens of a Gurdwara (a Sikh temple) every day. This dal is extremely popular and staple food in Punjab area of India and Pakistan. Takes at least a couple of hours of slow cooking after soaking the lentils and beans overnight in water.

Traditionally, in olden days, many North Indian kitchens had a tandoor (charcoal clay oven) where they cooked dinner. They used to put a pan up with the lentils and water overnight on this oven after all cooking is complete for the day as the charcoal gradually cooled. Slow cooking at its best.
Yup, I love exploring authentic dishes. Like Ragu, the ingredients will vary from village to village, especially in southern Italy. Tonight I'm cooking a authentic Ragu with Pesto: instead of spaghetti they tend to use Tagliatelle and use white wine and fresh tomatoes rather than tinned.

When it comes to Pesto as well as garlic & olive oil, I'll add a handful of fresh Parsley and two handfuls of Basil.

As with dishes from the Sub-continent, Mediterranean food originated as peasant food, whatever they could forage from the surrounding land.

Ground pork, celery, carrots, onions, tomato puree, fresh vine tomatoes, milk, white wine, garlic, Bayleaf, good stock (cubes are fine), hard Italian cheese grated just before dishing up.

I'll do side dishes of mushrooms with onion and blackened bell peppers
 
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plastic penguin

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I love beans on toast, but would imagine a picture is probably beneath the level of culinary expertise on show here!
You can pimp up baked beans. Treat them as with any other pulse (chick peas, kidney beans etc etc), softening a finely chopped onion, add peppers and mushrooms until soft, then add a tin of beans at the end. Makes a healthy and interesting breakfast. Add some toast and you're away.
 
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12th Monkey

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Aug 31, 2015
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You can pimp up baked beans. Treat them as with any other pulse (chick peas, kidney beans etc etc), softening a finely chopped onion, add peppers and mushrooms until soft, then add a tin of beans at the end. Makes a healthy and interesting breakfast. Add some toast and you're away.
I do! A little curry powder, a dash of mint sauce and some textured veg protein, and more than a dash of brown sauce. I think my tastebuds must be like Dave Lister's from Red Dwarf...
 

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