deep cryogenic treatment of hifi

timwileman

Well-known member
Mar 19, 2008
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read about this on a well known auction site, costs a lot of money to have some one freeze your kit to -190oC................bizzare and might just about invalidate any warrenty!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Yes I've read about this as well. Pertaining to high-quality interconnects and cabling, there was an option to have this cryo business done. I cannot, for the life of me, think of any reason for it.

Six months of the year I could stick my hifi outside for an hour and achieve damn near the same result!
 

timwileman

Well-known member
Mar 19, 2008
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i guess it might work as the opposite must be true.........ie sticking it in an oven at gas mark 7 for 3hr will make it sound worse :)........... ha ha
 
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Anonymous

Guest
All my cabling has had it (by the manufacturer) including my mains leads and block. The uprights on my support have too.

Don't ask me why, but it works for me.

The principle is utter ********s to me, I just did blind tests between stuff (without knowing what actually had been done, if anything at all), they looked exactly the same and in each case the cryo stuff was better. I don't know if it applies to all stuff and I would't recommend having stuff done afterwards, all my stuff was done by the manufacturer.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
It must be something along the lines of tempering the metal post-production? I know cold-forged steel has different properties than high-temper etc....
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Another case of audiophiles with too much devotion to equipment and not to music...buy a few more black or silver discs (disks if you're using the Majik)...hey we're back to black or silver debate!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Hughes123"]Another case of audiophiles with too much devotion to equipment and not to music...buy a few more black or silver discs (disks if you're using the Majik)...hey we're back to black or silver debate![/quote]

I already own more CDs than I will listen to in my lifetime, for me it's getting the most amount of enjoyment from them that I can. Why waste time listening on inferior equipment?

I don't have/never have had a Majik...

I just posted my observations, Mr Hughes, you know nothing about me to suggest I devote too much time to equipment. I don't consider myself an 'audiophile', I love music and I realised I enjoyed it more with better equipment. What's a couple of hours assessing equipment when it means many many more enjoying the music?

Anyone is welcome to come and have a listen to my system provided they bring biscuits or beer!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
The Majik bit was about a previous post on another thread. I'm sorry, but the laws of physics are against this one! You stress a metal, it won't be as good quality! Simple as! And when did I impose the statement upon you?
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="timwileman"]read about this on a well known auction site, costs a lot of money to have some one freeze your kit to -190oC................bizzare and might just about invalidate any warrenty![/quote]

Given that most manufacturers and audiophiles claim kit to run better warm...................you could probably add 1 year to the warming up time before you hit play.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I've also stumbled across the site. Highly entertaining.

http://www.frozensolidaudio.com/
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Hughes123"]I'm sorry, but the laws of physics are against this one! You stress a metal, it
won't be as good quality! Simple as! [/quote]Then what about the process of quenching that strengthens steel (for example samurai swords)? Please explain.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Solomon1"][quote user="Hughes123"]I'm sorry, but the laws of physics are against this one! You stress a metal, it
won't be as good quality! Simple as! [/quote]
Then what about the process of quenching that strengthens steel (for example samurai swords)? Please explain.
[/quote]

That's rapid cooling! They are heated to a very high temperature before hand!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Hughes123"][quote user="Solomon1"][quote user="Hughes123"]I'm sorry, but the laws of physics are against this one! You stress a metal, it won't be as good quality! Simple as! [/quote]

Then what about the process of quenching that strengthens steel (for example samurai swords)? Please explain.
[/quote]

That's rapid cooling! They are heated to a very high temperature before hand!
[/quote]I'm with you on that. But if rapidly cooling heated steel with room temperature water is all what's needed to strenghten it, then maybe you could do away with the heating process and instead cool the steel from room temperature to deep below zero celsius. It might even give better results, as suggested here:http://www.metalscience.com/techinfo_ASM.php
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Hughes123"][quote user="Solomon1"][quote user="Hughes123"]I'm sorry, but the laws of physics are against this one! You stress a metal, it
won't be as good quality! Simple as! [/quote]

Then what about the process of quenching that strengthens steel (for example samurai swords)? Please explain.
[/quote]

That's rapid cooling! They are heated to a very high temperature before hand!

[/quote]

I think Mr. S might have some deep frozen foo in his hi-fi.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
See, that could work! But just cooling it at a slow pace cannot produce any desired effects...although Russ Andrews will probably do it now!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Masterbluster"]

I think Mr. S might have some deep frozen foo in his hi-fi.

[/quote]No, I haven't. But if other's who have tested it found some benefit in it why should I immediately doubt their results? Isn't science all about keeping an open mind whilst testing your own assumptions?
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Hughes123"]See, that could work! But just cooling it at a slow pace cannot produce any desired effects...[/quote]That's what I thought! Anyway, it might also yield some results in hifi. I'm not ready to rule it out only on the basis what I've learned in school, but not tested myself.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
One would imagine the only cost-effective way to supercool anything would be to pour super-cooled (ideally not quite liquified) gas over it. Which would produce the necessary insta-cool we appear to have settled on.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
[quote user="Solomon1"][quote user="Hughes123"]See, that could work! But just cooling it at a slow pace cannot produce any desired effects...[/quote]That's what I thought!
Anyway, it might also yield some results in hifi. I'm not ready to rule it out only on the basis what I've learned in school, but not tested myself.[/quote]

I would rule it out on the grounds that it's based on false science and may cause damage. I don't need to try putting my CD player in a washing machine to know that it's a bad idea..
 

Diamond Joe

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2008
88
6
18,545
This is an interesting thread, I've looked at the frozensolidaudio.com website which didn't contain quite as much science as I would have hoped for, more of an extended sales pitch, but quite informative none the less.

I can see where they're coming from, it looks like they are improving the regularilty of a cables atomic structure, which in turn improves the signal path, although this only appears to affect the surface and very shallow outer layers.

I can only think that this will be noticeable at higher frequencies which will have an easier path (electrically speaking), as they only travel near the surface of the cable.

I don't know how many of you are aware of the skin effect, I've never seen it mentioned on the various cable debates, but it refers to the fact that as you increase the frequency of an alternating current the depth of the cable it passes through gets proportionally shallower. For example: at 10kHz the depth (from the surface that is) is only about 0.6mm, so high audio frequencies will only pass through the outer layers of a cable no matter how thick it is, hence why cable manufacturers use silver plating over copper to 'improve' higher frequencies, and possibly why some comment that they can sound bright. Of course at much higher frequencies a signal will only travel on the surface of a cable.

I want to stress that I have no interest in tinkering to this level, but I can see that it probably isn't in the realms of snake oil, although any benefits are most likely very small.
 

Thaiman

New member
Jul 28, 2007
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I wonder who is the first person that come up with the idea! Did his wife put all the shoping in the freezer one day including his beloved cables that he bought from Dixon? I can imagine he was hunting around all day until the dearest askd him to get some fish fingers out for dinner and there they are.....cryo....cryo he shouted.
 

Diamond Joe

Well-known member
Mar 1, 2008
88
6
18,545
It's probably more boring than that, I suspect it originated in a University lab somewhere or other.

As my Dad always says: "someone probably got a PhD out of that hare brained idea!"
 

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