Biwiring question

admin_exported

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Aug 10, 2019
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Hi,

At the moment I have my Monitor Audio BX2 speakers biwiring jumpers removed and have the HF and LF wired seperately. These wires then all go into the A channel of my amp. Is this the best way of wiring them or should I run the HF from the A channel of the amp and the LF from the B channel. I'm not sure how it works but I was under the impression that by using A+B I would be splitting the power that would normally be available if I was only using 1 channel. Is this correct or do both channels have seperate amplification?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Mohsin,

I would suggest doing away with the binding plates, then wire straight from amp: + to HF and - to LF and jump each LF and HF using speaker cable.

I often find that using cable instead of the plates is better, that is in terms of conductivity,

Does this make sense?

-- Otherwise, stick with how you have it now imho?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks for the reply AJ, I agree about using speaker cable instead of the metal jumpers. I'm still trying to find out if using both the A and B channels will result in more power being sent to the speakers.
 

hoopsontoast

New member
Oct 1, 2011
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Mohsin said:
Thanks for the reply AJ, I agree about using speaker cable instead of the metal jumpers. I'm still trying to find out if using both the A and B channels will result in more power being sent to the speakers.
No it wont I am afraid.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks for the reply, I had a feeling it wouldn't but thought it best to gather some advice.
 

Thompsonuxb

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Feb 19, 2012
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Not more power but better seperation - clarity, which will make your system sound 'louder' as opposed to noisey. I currently have an amp wired speaker A - right & speaker B - right driving the right channel ( speaker) and A - left and B-left the other channel and it sounds better than having speaker A driving LF (left and right) and Speakers B driving the HF. You do require 4 runs of wire though.

Make sure you have a reference CD to ensure you wire them correctly though, its easy to confuse ones self....lol.
 

RobinKidderminster

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May 27, 2009
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I didnt find biamping any advantage so didnt try biwire. May depend on lots of things but crossover design must determine its success. Some speaker manufacturers recommend and others little advice. Tried it today and went back to 7.1 fro prior 6.1
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Thompsonuxb, I'm a little confused by this. Does this mean I would run channel A right into the right speakers HF and channel A left into the left speakers HF then channel B right into the right speakers LF and channel B left into the left speakers LF?
 

Thompsonuxb

New member
Feb 19, 2012
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lol... reading that i'm confused too.

using both speaker outs A and B, you use the RIGHT channels of both to drive one speaker so A/R and B/R to drive your right speaker (hi & low frequencies) - use A/L and B/L to drive your left channel

thus :

A/R stands for speaker A RIGHT

B/R stands for speaker B RIGHT

To drive just your right speaker and the left channels to drive your left speaker.

With the Rotel I'm using its made a noticeble difference, Better bass performance, only thing changed in the setup is the configuration of the speaker cables. No speaker repositioning or anything.
 

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