Biamp or not to biamp on the Marantz MCR603

admin_exported

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Aug 10, 2019
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Hi

I'm a bit confused, about the biamp mode on the Marantz MCR603. The manual tells that the power output is dropping from 50 to 25 watts in biamp mode.

Does this mean, that it's loosing the ability to drive large floorstand speakers?

Would it be better to biwire instead, and use the speaker a port only?
 

shooter

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May 4, 2008
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That will depend on the floor-stander in question and if you are running two pairs of speakers.

If you are running two pairs and the floor-stander has a low sensitivity, below 90db, then it may struggle to drive them.

If you have one pair it would be easier on the amp and yes you can bi-wire them without halving the output of the amp. Follow the instructions.

What floor-standers are they?
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'll only use one pair of speakers (Mission 794SE).

As I understand, the biamp mode on the MCR603, delivers the same audio on speakers a and b - so that's not real biamp? Real biamp means crossovers in each amp section - right? One amp for lf and another for hf?

All together - does it mean, that I'll obtain the same amount of power in biamp mode, as I do when only using one speaker output -when only using one pair of speakers?
 

chebby

Well-known member
Jun 2, 2008
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Hans Mouridsen said:
Real biamp means crossovers in each amp section - right?
No.

Bi-amping still has the (split) crossover in the speakers. You are describing something like active/electronic crossovers.

Why not just try it (bi-amp mode on your Marantz) and see whether it sounds better.

Luckily I don't have the option with my - single wired only - speakers
 

shooter

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May 4, 2008
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Bi-amping will still give you 50 watts per speaker but it's split equally between HF/MF and LF. The problem i have with this is that H/F would be the tweeter and L/F would be the driver and in a two way unit like the 794SE the driver and mid MF would be coupled in this config: HF and MF/LF. Ideally you would want more watts going to the driver, maybe a 70/30 split.

I would have run a single of speaker cable and have the 50 watts available.
 

shooter

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May 4, 2008
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Sorry Hans Mouridsen reading that again i'm not sure what i've put above is correct. It seems as watts will half in bi-amp mode whatever way you run it, singularly or pairs of speaker.

I would though still stick with a single run of cable.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I think I understand....


Why are passive crossovers in speakers not like lf = driver, and hf = mid and high? So the power can be shared about equally...?

I'll try both biamp, and normal biwire, and see whats best


Thank you for the good explanation
 

shooter

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May 4, 2008
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Not sure it was such a good explanation
should of read the manual better, thanks though.


Not all crossover points are the same you will get some high mids rolling over to the tweeter. Depends on the tweeter quality and it's own frequency range.

Yes give it go, let us know how you get on.
 

jiggyjoe

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Aug 21, 2010
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Some very strange specs going on with these marantz all-in-ones? .

First they seem to be able to put out more power than they consume ( 50w consumption yet 2 times 60w into 6 ohms) which is impossible even if they have class D power stages.

Then bi-amp capable yet halve the power when using both A+B terminals?

To bi-amp you need 4 Channel output stages yet they only specify 2 channel?

Perhaps marantz can enlighten us!
 

jiggyjoe

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Aug 21, 2010
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Just seen the manual for the 603 and specified for 2*50w into 8ohms at 10%!!!!!! total harmonic distortion.

If your speakers are still working lol!

Get this baby on the test bench and you would be lucky to see 2*20 rms into 8ohms.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
jiggyjoe said:
Just seen the manual for the 603 and specified for 2*50w into 8ohms at 10%!!!!!! total harmonic distortion.

If your speakers are still working lol!

Get this baby on the test bench and you would be lucky to see 2*20 rms into 8ohms.
Here's what the manual says...:

Audio section

Rated output

(1 kHz, total harmonic distortion 0.7 %, 8 Ω) 40 W + 40 W

(1 kHz, total harmonic distortion 0.7 %, 6 Ω) 50 W + 50 W

Effective maximum output

(1 kHz, total harmonic distortion 10 %, 8 Ω) 50 W + 50 W

(1 kHz, total harmonic distortion 10 %, 6 Ω) 60 W + 60 W

Input sensitivity/impedance

AUX1 110 mV/24 kΩ

AUX2, AUX3 200 mV/32 kΩ

Frequency response (5 W, 8 Ω)

AUX input 5 Hz to 20 kHz (±3 dB)

Total harmonic distortion (1 kHz, 5 W, 8 Ω)

AUX input 0.05 %

S/N ratio (10 W, 8 Ω, IHF-A)

AUX input 86 dB

and here specs for homepage...:

Specifications [/list]

Freq. Response (analog In)5 Hz - 22 kHzFrequency Range FM87.5 - 108 MHzNumber of Channels2Power Output (6 ohm, 1kHz)60 WSignal to Noise Ratio (audio)86 dBSignal to Noise Ratio (Mono/Stereo) FM65 / 60 dBSignal to Noise Ratio (Mono/Stereo)90 dBTotal Harmonic Distortion (audio)0.05%Total Harmonic Distortion (Mono/Stereo) FM0.8 / 1.0%

As I understand the 50 Watts in 6 Ohm, is when using both channels....? 2 pair of speakers....
 

shooter

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May 4, 2008
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No: 50 watts @ 6 ohm's when running 1 pair of speakers wired singularly.

Marantz's take on bi-amping is unusual.

It seams though if you run 2 pairs of speaker and/or bi-wire from output a & b you will half the output too 25 @ 8 ohm.

I would only use a single run of cable and 1 pair of speakers.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
shooter69 said:
No: 50 watts @ 6 ohm's when running 1 pair of speakers wired singularly.

Marantz's take on bi-amping is unusual.

It seams though if you run 2 pairs of speaker and/or bi-wire from output a & b you will half the output too 25 @ 8 ohm.

I would only use a single run of cable and 1 pair of speakers.
It's confusing I think ;)

The homepage specs says 60 w @ 6 ohm, with thd 0.05%

I'll try both biamp and biwire, and see what's best :)
 

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