Bi-wire speaker config ??

A

Anonymous

Guest
No, they don't. Two positive terminals cannot make for a whole high nor low frequency input : each input must have its own + and -. Usually, behind a speaker, the two terminals for the Low Frequencies (LF) are the lowest set of binding posts, and the two terminals for High Frequencies (HF) are the highest set of binding post; typically, red binding post will indicate for positive, and black binding post for negative. However, some manufacturers differ as to whether set is HF or LF, so you have to make sure, ie. verify the indications next to each set of terminals on the back of the speaker itself, or in your speakers owner's manual if no indications can be found on the unit.

The Chord wire you are talking about was intended for bi-wiring, as you know, but the company also dedicated each of the four thread for a specific connector for maximum efficiency : the Chord Rumour, when unshielded at the ends, should present as two separated twisted pair of distinctly coloured wires; though, each twisted pair has a white wire for the negative HF or LF, so you'll only be sure which pair is which by identifying the positive wires. The LF positive is the black-striped one, so the all-white one twisted with it is gonna be the LF negative; typically, they will be connected to the lowest set of binding posts, all-white in black binding post marked "-", black-striped in red binding post marked "+". Similarly, the HF positive is the red-striped one, so the all-white one twisted with it is gonna be the HF negative; typically, they will be connected to the highest set of binding posts, all-white in black binding post marked "-", red-striped in red binding post marked "+". Be sure to check your amp configuration too...
 

Thumpa

New member
Sep 15, 2011
5
0
0
Visit site
Wow ... thank you very much. I felt like a bit of a dweeb but I'm glad I asked.

Hope you work for yourself, the pay should be commensurate!!

Thanks again
 

Thumpa

New member
Sep 15, 2011
5
0
0
Visit site
PhilBlvdElec said:
The LF positive is the black-striped one, so the all-white one twisted with it is gonna be the LF negative; typically, they will be connected to the lowest set of binding posts, all-white in black binding post marked "-", black-striped in red binding post marked "+". Similarly, the HF positive is the red-striped one, so the all-white one twisted with it is gonna be the HF negative...

The reason I got it wrong was in the belief that, quite simply, Red = positive and Black = negative; I thought that in lay terms, this was the universal standard, if you like. I thought the Red stripe and the white cable twisted with it were both positive, similarly, the pair with the Black stripe was neg...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
You should not justify yourself so much, I had to check on the site first, and I have to admit it can easily be misunderstood when not used to this... That's why I've used so much details and repetitions in my explanation, not because I thought you weren't smart enough. Now you know, and some time, perhaps, you'll explain it yourself to someone else! I'm still wondering why they work this way... Check that instead : two red wires, one white-stripped, for the two positives; two black wires, one white-stripped, for the two negatives : full red and black go to HF, stripped red and black go to LF... Ain't that simple, logical, and easy enough to manufacture?! Guess someone will have to explain to ME why no company use this simple, universally intuitive coding... or something alike... :?

Wish you great times with your system! :dance:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
BTW, I don't work for myself, but the pay is quite correct... and I would certainly sleep overnight on the demo room couch listening to great speakers and separates if I could, so I guess I'm happy with it!
 

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts