5G explained: the network, phones, speeds and more

F8lee

Well-known member
Dec 20, 2019
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While 5G has certainly been hitting the peak of the hype cycle, as I understand it another genuine difference may well be a lack of reliability under emergency circumstances.

Since it uses a higher bandwidth, 5G required many more transceivers to be installed in a given area. That's fine, but with a huge increase (as I understand the requirement) odds are that they will not each have backup battery power to be used in case of emergencies. Today people are familiar with the concept that, in a blackout, say, their cellphones will still operate - and this of course is because the network operators have backup batteries installed on the relatively few towers used in 4G systems.

I gues it remains to be seen if they will do the same for the ar more 5G devices required; if not, folks may be in for a rude awakening when a problem arises.
 
Dec 20, 2019
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Sad that not one mention in your article that many health experts fear there are unavoidable health risks with 5G. Even if your editorial staff takes these with a grain of salt they are at least worthy of mention as being possible/controversial or something like that. You sinned by omission I think.
 

alistairbooth

Member
Dec 22, 2019
1
0
20
Sad that not one mention in your article that many health experts fear there are unavoidable health risks with 5G. Even if your editorial staff takes these with a grain of salt they are at least worthy of mention as being possible/controversial or something like that. You sinned by omission I think.
The same Tinfoil hat brigade came out with this when 4G came out. wireless broadcast signals are only harmful if you put your head on the transmitter for a few weeks at a time.
 

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